In the health and fitness industry, you will come across people who claim to be medical doctors, fitness experts, fitness instructors, nutritionists and certified personal trainers. These people will create workouts, hand out information, advice and recommendations on health, nutrition and exercise as if they are handing out Halloween candies. How do you know if the information being given is from someone who has the knowledge, education and training to give you advice on health and fitness matters? 

“False Prophets of Fitness” are those people who do not have the degrees, certifications or credentials to be health and fitness experts. These “prophets” start blogs. They create online fitness videos and dvds. They lead boot camps and other workout classes. They give advice on diet/nutrition and tell you how and what to eat. You might say to yourself, “What is the harm?” 

The harm with false prophets of fitness is that inappropriate workout and nutrition plans can affect the body in a negative way and can cause long term medical and health problems. False prophets of fitness do not have the education, skills, training and knowledge needed to develop safe and effective
workout and nutrition plans. Unlike certified/credentialed personal trainers,
nutritionists and dieticians, false prophets of fitness do not take classes, go
to workshops or training seminars, or otherwise stay current on scientifically
based health, fitness and nutrition matters. The workout and nutrition plans
that false prophets of fitness promote are usually not researched, tested or
scientifically based.  

Now, you might still be saying to yourself, “What is the harm with taking health, fitness and nutrition advice from someone who doesn’t have the appropriate credentials?” Well, I would like you to ask yourself, would you take advice from an unlicensed/uneducated lawyer or doctor? 
 
Like a lawyer or doctor, a personal trainer/nutritionist/dietician must take classes and pass exams in order to get certified. Once he/she has received his/her certification, in order to maintain it, the personal trainer/nutritionist/dietician must stay knowledgeable on current scientifically based health, fitness and nutritional developments. In order to stay current, a board of certification’s approved continuing education classes (CEUs) must be taken. If the CEUs do not fit the board’s required standards, the certification does not get renewed. 

Certified/credentialed health and fitness professionals are held accountable to a national (or international) health and fitness board. The board ensures that
trainer/nutritionist/dietician is qualified, maintains a level of competency and knowledge that protects the health and safety of the community which the health and fitness professional serves. That being said, certified/credentialed health and fitness professionals must be CPR (Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation) and AED (Automated External Defibrillation) certified. These are life saving techniques. Without these certifications, the board of certification will revoke the
certification/credential.

In addition, like a lawyer or doctor, a certified/credentialed personal
trainer/nutritionist/dietician must follow a code of ethics and conduct. If the
personal trainer/nutritionist/dietician does not follow the code of ethics and conduct and/or the board does not feel that the trainer/nutritionist/dietician is competent, knowledgeable or is using safe practices, the board will cancel the certification/credential.

In the Health and Fitness industry, there are many False Prophets of Fitness. The workout programs and nutrition plans that false prophets promote are usually not researched, tested or scientifically based and can cause long term health problems. When looking for fitness videos and classes as well as looking for diet and nutritional advice, it is important to do research to make sure that the fitness information and nutritional advice is from a reputable source. A reputable source is a source that has the background, training, knowledge, education and credentials that gives that source the ability to pass on information and advice on health and fitness matters. 
 
10 common signs of a “False Prophets of Fitness”:

1.  Will not have the appropriate degrees, credentials and/or certificates in health, fitness and nutrition.

2.  Will not list his/her credentials, certifications, education, training or background.

3.  When asked, what his/her certifications/credentials are, a false prophet of fitness will have a difficult time giving a straight, to-the-point answer.

4.  Will claim to have a specific certification/credential but his/her certification/credential cannot be validated through a recognized certifying agency.

5.  May only have a specialty certification (Zumba, TKB, BodyPump, ect.). A specialty certification allows the instructor to teach that format but does not allow the instructor to give specific, individualized health and fitness information or advice.

6.  Will sometimes use credentials, that are not relevant to health, fitness or nutrition (such as a Ph.D/Doctor of Computer Science), as a method to make themselves appear to be a doctor or expert of health and medicine. 

7.  May usually prescribe the same workout and nutrition plans to all of his/her clients.

8.  Is usually unable to answer health, fitness and nutrition questions.

9.  Will post articles and other documents, which are repeats of information already posted by certified/credentialed experts, and may try to pass this information off as his/her own.

10.  Is usually not CPR/AED certified.

 © Training By Shola and Shola FitnessTrainer
All information provided by Training By Shola, Shola FitnessTrainer is of a general nature and is furnished only for educational/entertainment purposes only. No information is to be taken as medical or other health advice. You agree that use of this information is at your own risk and hold Training By Shola, Shola FitnessTrainer harmless from any and all losses, liabilities, injuries or damages resulting from any and all use. Reader/user assumes full liability of use.

 
 
The other night I was asked, “What is the difference between the wide and the narrow leg burpee and if the wide leg burpee is “safer” than the narrow leg burpee?” What a fantastic question! 

If you are new to exercising and/or new to performing a burpee, I recommend that you start off learning the proper form and technique from a trained/certified health and fitness professional (personal trainer, coach, sport performance specialist, etc.). If you have injuries, this is important because you don’t want to aggravate them. If you don’t have injuries, you don’t want to create them by performing this exercise improperly. A trained/certified health and fitness professional has the ability to look at your body alignment and give you the appropriate modifications for your injuries and/or muscular imbalances. A trained/certified health and fitness professional also has the ability to tell you whether you should or should not perform this exercise, based on your current fitness level and state of health.

Let me paint a picture for those who have not had the joy of experiencing a burpee first hand. To perform a burpee, you do not need any equipment: a) start in a standing position; b) crouch as if you are trying to squat down then place your hands on the floor in front of you; c) quickly jump both feet back, into a plank; d) quickly bring your feet back under you; e) jump up as high as you can, land softly on your feet with slightly bent knees. 

Now there are many variations of the burpee. You can add a push up, squat, knee tuck, etc. That’s the beauty of the burpee! There are so many ways to make it more challenging…and fun!

What is the difference between a wide and a narrow leg burpee? When you are performing a wide leg burpee, you are on your toes; your legs are apart and are wider than shoulder width. With a narrow leg burpee, you are on your toes; your legs are close together, narrower than hip width. 
 
When you are performing a wide leg burpee, you bring your limbs (legs and feet), away from the mid-line/center of your body. You are in a reverse “Y”. The exercise is less difficult because you are getting assistance, with balance and/or strength, from your legs. You are not as dependent on the muscles of the core, that are responsible for stabilization and movement (such as transverse abdominis, internal obliques, rectus abdominis, external obliques and the erector spinae), to keep your body level and even.

When you are performing a narrow leg burpee, you bring your limbs (legs and feet), close to the mid-line/center of your body. You are in a straight line. The exercise becomes more difficult because you are not getting assistance from your legs to aid with balance and/or strength. You are dependent on the muscles of the core, to keep your body level and even.

Is the wide leg burpee “safer” than the narrow leg burpee? Not necessarily. The wide leg burpee is a modified burpee variation so that you can perform the exercise more safely.  
 
Any exercise, performed without proper form, can be unsafe. Since the narrow leg burpee requires you to have more core stabilization, strength and control, it is important that you build the strength in these muscles, prior to performing the burpee, so that you reduce your chance of injury. One exercise that you can do that will help build the strength of the core muscles is the plank. The plank exercise targets the muscles of the core that keep the body level, even and stable while performing the burpee.

When performed properly, the burpee is a fun, powerful, challenging exercise that builds endurance, strength and agility while increasing the cardiovascular system’s ability to be more efficient and effective at oxygen utilization and consumption as well as increasing the body’s ability to recover after exercising.


© copyright 2013 Training By Shola and Shola FitnessTrainer

All information provided by Training By Shola, Shola FitnessTrainer is of a general nature and is furnished only for educational/entertainment purposes only. No information is to be taken as
medical or other health advice. You agree that use of this information is at your own risk and hold Training By Shola, Shola FitnessTrainer harmless from any and all losses, liabilities, injuries or damages resulting from any and all use. Reader/user assumes full liability of use.


 
 
Treat yourself as you would treat your favorite sports team. What do I mean by that? Well...you sit on the couch all day on Sunday and yell cheers of love, at the t.v., for your favorite football team. If someone bad-mouths your team, you get upset and talk back in defense. Win or lose, you root for your team and give it your full support. You claim the title "#1 fan" for your favorite sports team, and yet you fall short of sending love and devotion inward to yourself.

Truth be told, your workouts are not always going to be easy. You are not always going to break a "personal record". Even so, you will still break records. You will break the record for total number of times you have gotten up and gone for a run, in spite of being tired and having sore muscles. Even though you’re not a morning person, you will break the record for number of times you have gotten up and gone to the 6:00am Spin class.

In your health and fitness journey, take the time to appreciate your achievements. Be proud of yourself and the work you have accomplished. Pat yourself on the back. Become your BIGGEST #1 FAN.

© copyright 2013 - Training By Shola and Shola FitnessTrainer

All information provided by Training By Shola, Shola FitnessTrainer is of a general nature and is furnished only for educational/entertainment purposes only. No information is to be taken as medical or other health advice. You agree that use of this information is at your own risk and hold Training By Shola, Shola FitnessTrainer harmless from any and all losses, liabilities, injuries or damages resulting from any and all use. Reader/user assumes full liability of use.